Forces of Nature or Climate Change?

Many of the top world climate scientists believe the UN conference in Paris at the end of this year is our last chance to avoid global warming and climate change on a calamitous scale.

The increase in global warming must not exceed 2°C above pre-industrial levels, and the world needs to work together to prevent this for our climate, our economy and our communities.

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Margaret River bush fires, Western Australia

Fires, floods, droughts and cyclones are costing lives and livelihoods and reducing our productivity.

Instead of limiting our consumption of fossil fuels the world, in general, wants more.

We know that clean renewable energy is almost as cheap as fossil fuels, yet the big polluters have the ears of our governments.

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Dogs playing in flood water – River Ouse, North Yorkshire, England.

We are at risk of becoming complacent as these events become more common, so that in the end we fail to act.

We can do something before it is too late.

For further information:

http://350.org/

http://www.greenpeace.org/

http://www.1millionwomen.com.au/

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/series/keep-it-in-the-ground

http://www.foe.org/

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/forces-of-nature/

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Wild Weekends

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Margaret River, Western Australia

Nowadays  my wild weekends are more about the weather than behaviour. When did that happen I wonder?

In my late teens as a university student living away from home, the weekends were truly wild. I think partying hard became a culture. Then in my early twenties, with a decent income and less free time, cramming as much into the weekend as was physically possible became a way of life. Even with the move to new countries and cultures in my later twenties and thirties, weekends were still focused on enjoyment, partying and very little chill time. It must have been the onset of a family that slowed me down. No longer could I be egocentric and hedonistic, I had new duties and the great desire for more sleep. Finally I’d slowed down.

Standing braced into the wind while the surf roars and pounds, I breathe the salty air.  This weekend was all about breathing, getting in touch with the self and spending time on just being.

In what has become a far too hectic life I am relieved that my mobile phone lies switched off at the bottom of my handbag somewhere in my room, that the laptop is unattached to the internet, but there just in case I feel like typing rather than writing, and also that no-one knows exactly where we are. Of course I will turn the phone on at least once a day to check if there is a message from my family, not because I want to play Candy Crush or check Facebook.

It’s only a few hours from where I live but clichéd or not, it could be a different world. Isn’t that what short breaks are all about? A break from the life we are in.  I wonder about those who can’t afford to ‘get away’. Can you get away without actually going anywhere? Is that what meditation is all about? Did we need to drive all this way to find a space to walk, eat, read and talk, to meditate, do chi kung and tai chi, and help the energy flow more easily through our bodies?

Perhaps if I was more disciplined I wouldn’t need to travel so far to feel my body relax, my mind run free and my spirit revive. I could perhaps sit on the deck in my back garden and try to block out the hum of the highway, or rise early to meditate before the rest of the household can come into my space, or walk the beach without silently planning what I will buy in Wooolworths, or to remember to put the washer on as soon as I get home to wash my daughter’s school uniform, or even breathe deeply as I drive to work instead of worrying about the driver behind me who is texting on her phone and liable to run into me. But of course she does, and that’s another story…

 

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