Sweet

Les Halles de Lyon Paul Bocuse is a famous food market in Lyon, France. Last year we were there on Valentines Day. A food lovers paradise, the markets have an array of some of the finest produce in France, including  these delicious sweet offerings.

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Sadly Paul Bocuse, probably one of the most prominent chefs of our time, died earlier this year aged 91. He held a 3 star Michelin rating for over 50 years.

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Red-tailed, black cockatoos of Western Australia, with their loud distinctive calls, are classified as a threatened species, mainly due to habitat loss. I took this photo when a small flock temporarily settled, with great noise and attitude, in the gum tree in front of our house, before they moved on to feed in another tree close by. I always find their noisy movement and chatter uplifting as they charge the air with their energy and antics. They can live to fifty years of age and there is concern that a lot of the birds we are now seeing are these older birds and not juveniles, as successfully breeding is affected dramatically by vegetation clearing and lack of tree hollows for nesting. I hope that Perth will stop expanding in the destructive urban sprawl that often forces the clear-felling of bushland, and that we will continue to be visited by these beloved birds for many years to come.

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Beloved Birds

Make a Difference

For many decades I have thought of myself as an environmentalist. I’ve participated in protests against environmental destruction, I am a member of various groups and organisations that advocate protection of our environment and I engage in a lot of ‘armchair activism’.  Last year I was humbled when I went to see a talk given by an amazing, seemingly indefatigable woman in her 80s, one of my favourite environmentalists, Dr Jane Goodall.

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Jane Goodall being interviewed, Perth 2017

I first came across her name when studying psychology in the late 70s,  and then again while doing my Masters some years later when I undertook a study of language in apes. I’d also lived for many years in Tanzania, her adopted country where she has spent many years of her life studying the social and family interactions of wild chimpanzees in Gombe Stream National Park, although now she is travelling for almost 300 days a year in her advocacy work. She started her travels in a quest to save chimpanzees from extinction and this developed into a much broader conservation platform. As I listened that evening, it was not only the fact that she had given her whole life to conservation, often in the face of grim opposition, but it was her hope for the future that inspired.

So when I thought about my growth as a person over the last few years and how I hope I will grow in the future, it is my activism that I am most passionate about. Whether it be  standing in the freezing cold of a North Yorkshire winter to stop fracking vehicles passing, speaking out against multinationals and their greed, stopping a pointless road going through important wetlands in Western Australia, or protesting about the abuse of human rights in Australia’s refugee policy, I know I will not sit quietly this year.

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Protesting a road to nowhere – Roe 8 in Beeliar Wetlands, 2017

As Jane Goodall says, ‘It’s amazing what happens when people see the difference they can make.’

 

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